Posts Tagged ‘Architectural As-Built Drawings’

The Renovation Process – Where To Begin

October 26th, 2011 by Lori Gilder | No Comments

Granted there are some home improvements projects that may not require permits. But having said that, different cities and States do have their own requirements, so make sure to check with your local Building Department before you start. A visit to your local permitting office is the only way to know for sure if you need a permit or not. The officers there will be more than happy to discuss these issues with you so they can avoid future code violations.

In this video I give you THE starting point for when you have decided to go ahead with a renovation.  I would highly recommend starting here :)

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Be Inspired!

 

 

 

Please leave your questions or comments below this post, and fill out the form on the right hand side of this page to receive your free copy of my special report: “15 Money Saving Strategies When Planning Your Home Renovation”

Article by Lori Gilder, Architectural Interior Designer, Los Angeles, Ca. © 2011 Lori Gilder. Interior Makeovers Inc.

When You Need Architectural As-Built Drawings

December 10th, 2009 by Lori Gilder | No Comments

Brown Residence, Week 4Measuring1  4-2

One of the main objectives for Liz and Mark Brown’s renovation and addition to their current home is to ensure the new construction blends in seamlessly with the old.  And a well conceived home renovation project hinges on the precision planning and accurate measurements of a quality set of as-built plans.

These valuable drawings will be used to show what’s existing, what’s to be demolished, what’s remaining and the proposed new construction.   Due to the size and scope of this particular project, we are required by our local building and safety department to submit a comprehensive set of as-built plans (Site Plan, Floor Plan, Exterior Elevations and Roof Plan) attached to the construction document set.

Unfortunately the only plans Liz was able to provide were partial plans of their home, from a past project that never happened.  So I called upon my draftsman to meet at the site where we rolled up our sleeves and got to work measuring the exterior of the building – all doors, windows, roof pitches and soffit details.  He then returned the following day with a plan of the building’s shell in hand, and over the next several hours measured the interior from top to bottom. All interior walls, cabinets, doors and windows, fixtures, appliances – the list goes on.  It should take a week or two before we get them back.  In the meantime there are plenty of other details to work on.Measuring 2  4-2

If your project involves a renovation or addition of any kind – before you even begin – take a trip down to your local building and safety office and tell them of your plans. They’ll be more than happy to guide you down the right path.  Ask them for a Residential Plan Check List which will educate you on what you’ll need to provide the office for permitting and who you’ll need to hire to help get you there. A little research up front will save you time and money in the end.

I encourage you leave questions or comments below this post, and fill out the form on the right hand side of this page to receive your free copy of my special report: “How to Avoid the 15 Most Common Decorating Mistakes”

Article by Lori Gilder, Architectural Interior Designer, Los Angeles, Ca.
© 2009 Lori Gilder. Interior Makeovers Inc

What Are Architectural As-Built Drawings?

December 8th, 2009 by Lori Gilder | No Comments

When planning a major remodel, renovation or addition to your existing home it’s likely your local building department will require a set of as-built plans, which illustrates your home in its current condition.  Think of these drawings as the “BEFORE” set, and the final and approved construction documents as the “AFTER” set.

In a nutshell as-built drawings are detailed plans of your property that represents all structures and site conditions, as they exist today.  These drawings are site measured and field verified and may include any of the following:

Site Plan.

This is an aerial view of your site that depicts your home and all existing structures situated on your plot of land, bordered by its property lines.  It details all streets, driveways and easements, as well as all front, side and rear setback measurements specific to your property. Typically you’ll also require an assessor’s parcel map of your property, which is easy to obtain at zimas.lacity.org. (Zone Information and Map Assess System).

Floor Plans.

The floor plans are scaled diagrams of one level of a structure as seen from above.  It not only shows room sizes, but detailed door and window sizes and locations, existing cabinetry, appliances, fixtures, stairwells, ceiling heights, and mechanical equipment locations.  This documents everything that exists on each floor of your house – now.

Exterior Elevations.

This is the vertical view of the building’s exterior, which typically shows the front, rear and sides of the house, including all door and window locations and heights, soffit and fascia details, siding materials, chimney locations and roof pitch, as it currently exists.

Roof Plan.Roof Plan Sample 4-1

This depicts the layout of the rooflines complete with dormers, gables, ridges, hip and valleys. In the case of an addition, this plan will help you integrate a new roof seamlessly with the existing roofline.

Check with your local building and safety department and learn the extent of what type of as-builts plans they’ll require for your home renovation project.  Depending on the scope and size, you may be lucky and only need to provide them with a portion of the existing house.

I encourage you leave questions or comments below this post, and fill out the form on the right hand side of this page to receive your free copy of my special report: “How to Avoid the 15 Most Common Decorating Mistakes”

Article by Lori Gilder, Architectural Interior Designer, Los Angeles, Ca.
© 2009 Lori Gilder. Interior Makeovers Inc