Posts Tagged ‘Planning’

Designing An Open Floor Plan

March 11th, 2012 by Lori Gilder | No Comments

A popular home renovation trend is to re-purpose and  re-configure traditional layouts into more open spaces.  Removing interior walls not only improves the flow to a home, it also creates an open and flexible floor plan, which is more casual, comfortable and versatile for families who love to entertain.   But before you start the process, let me share some advice.

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Stay Inspired!

 

 

 

I encourage you leave questions or comments below this post, and fill out the form on the right hand side of this page to receive your free copy of my special report: “15 Money Saving Strategies When Planning Your Home Renovation”

Article by Lori Gilder, Architectural Interior Designer, Los Angeles, Ca. © 2012 Lori Gilder. Interior Makeovers Inc.

Master Bathroom Renovation – Why To Create A Concept First

January 26th, 2011 by Lori Gilder | 4 Comments

I’m participating in an interesting “blog off” hosted by elocal USA – the Nation’s #1 Online Directories. It is a series intended to bring bloggers and professionals together to discuss the hot trends and topics in the world of home improvement and design while providing useful information and engaging conversation to you (the homeowner).

Here is the first question in the series.

Q:  “When in the design process should plumbing and electrical decisions be made”?

A:  Should the homeowner create a concept for the space first, saving all plumbing and electrical decisions for later, so as not to influence the creative vision?

Or

A:  Should the homeowner make plumbing and electrical decisions first, designing a concept around the appropriate plumbing and electrical capabilities first?

Here’s a more detailed version of my answer:

A: I’ve lost count but I’ve probably designed close to one hundred bathrooms over the years.  They’ve come in all shapes, sizes and budgets, yet at the end of the day each of my clients share one common goal: To re-design their tired, dingy and dated master bathroom by improving its overall function and bring it into the 21st century.

Whether it’s a partial remodel or a full bathroom renovation – you’ll be required to re-think the space from top to bottom, and in order to get exactly what you want – you’ll need to ask yourself questions like these:

  • What is our creative vision?
  • How do we make this space more user-friendly and elegant at the same time?
  • Do we need to remove walls, add space, add new or relocate windows, plumbing and electrical to get what we want?
  • Where is the best location for the spa tub and steam shower for two?
  • Do we have space for a private WC?

We live very differently today than in years past and many times the dysfunctional bathroom layouts of 20+ years ago, require some re-working of the floor plan in order to provide you (the homeowner) with a more user-friendly design.  An efficient floor plan, layout and flow are everything!  If your original bathroom footprint works for you – fabulous!   But often times the perfect design solution means re-orienting and relocating plumbing and electrical to accommodate the changing needs of the homeowner.  In this case function and concept come first and the mechanics follow.

The smart approach to creating your spa retreat is to develop the concept for your master bathroom space first – saving all plumbing and electrical decisions for later, so as not to compromise the creative vision and the mission at hand.

The reality is, when conceptualizing your new master bath plans, plumbing and electrical considerations are made in conjunction with the overall design concept – as they are integral to the ideal design solution.

Remember, If your master bath’s original footprint continues to meet your needs and functions perfectly well, then maintaining the original plumbing walls, stacks and other mechanics will save you money in the long run.  If however you’re borrowing some existing space from within the home or even adding extra square footage to create a larger master bath, then it’s more than likely that the plumbing and electrical will need to be relocated and supplemented for your new master bath work more efficiently.

Join in on the discussion.  Would love to hear your input and comments. http://www.elocal.plumbers.com/blog/blogoff-when-to-make-plumbing-electrical-decisions-4259

Stay Inspired!

I encourage you leave questions or comments below this post, and fill out the form on the right hand side of this page to receive your free copy of my special report: “15 Money Saving Strategies When Planning Your Home Renovation”

Article by Lori Gilder, Architectural Interior Designer, Los Angeles, Ca. © 2011 Lori Gilder. Interior Makeovers Inc.

On The Drawing Board!

January 5th, 2010 by Lori Gilder | No Comments

When it comes to planning your home addition or renovation project, the Programming and Schematic Design Phase are where the “heavy lifting” begins.  By that I mean – what was once considered your “wish list” now becomes the foundation that develops the overall concept of your new and improved dream home.  This is where your remodel or addition project is built – one decision at a time – where client requirements and criteria are determined and budgetary assessments are made.

A thorough Programming Phase helps maintain a more cost effective design process as your home renovation project progresses.  Your family’s goals, wishes, needs, expectations and aesthetics are implemented into this phase as it lays the framework and sets the stage for what’s to come.

Once your concept is established and the programming is approved, the Schematic Design phase integrates all the design criteria gathered and translates it into a well-defined design.

The schematics tend to be the most creative and exciting phases of the home planning process.  It’s where spatial relationships are considered, the floor plan’s flow is established and the exterior facades begin to take shape.

Typically the Schematic Design Phase includes:

  • Preliminary floor plans, elevations, sections.
  • Dimensions, area, volume.
  • Site plan considerations and new addition locations.
  • Room layouts.
  • Preliminary material selections.
  • Preliminary exterior landscaping concepts.
  • Preliminary plumbing and electrical.
  • Structural Engineering – such as foundation and roofing systems
  • Preliminary cost estimates
  • Co-ordination with any other specialists.

This is an important time in the planning process.  It’s really much easier to revise and make changes to your plan now while everything is still on paper, rather than later when your foundation is poured and your walls are framed.

I encourage you leave questions or comments below this post, and fill out the form on the right hand side of this page to receive your free copy of my special report: “How to Avoid the 15 Most Common Decorating Mistakes”

Article by Lori Gilder, Architectural Interior Designer, Los Angeles, Ca.
© 2010 Lori Gilder. Interior Makeovers Inc

What You “Need To Know” About Your Home While Planning For Your Renovation

December 3rd, 2009 by Lori Gilder | No Comments

Brown Residence, Week 3

Need List_ Inspection 3-2 (1st)Since the Brown’s took their time in assessing their family’s needs by asking themselves a litany of questions, they were able to evaluate their current situation, determine their goals and compile a solid dream home “wish list”.  This is a critical step in the pre-planning process and makes all the difference between a good home renovation project – and a great one!

With a whole house remodel of this magnitude and a potential budget to match, it’s equally important to move on to the next set step of establishing a “need list”. More specifically, we need to determine what condition their house is currently in – and learn as much as we can about its weaknesses – both inside and out.

What we’re looking for:

  • Cracks in the existing foundation.
  • Rotting or splitting around doors and windows.
  • Sagging roof sections or missing shingles.
  • Antiquated wiring – which could potentially become a fire hazard.
  • The current amp capacity (which will need to be increased in order to accommodate their wish list).
  • Check plumbing and water pressure and temperature.  If the pipes are galvanized steel then upgrade them to copper.Need List_Inspection 3-2 (2nd)

If you’re in a similar situation and it seems a bit overwhelming, consider calling in a contractor or building inspector before you even begin the renovation process, and have them conduct a physical inspection of your home.  You’ll have a much better assessment of where you stand.

The “need (to fix it) list” may not be part of the Brown’s original plan – but it’s necessary to ensure their money will be wisely spent.

I encourage you leave questions or comments below this post, and fill out the form on the right hand side of this page to receive your free copy of my special report: “How to Avoid the 15 Most Common Decorating Mistakes”

Article by Lori Gilder, Architectural Interior Designer, Los Angeles, Ca.
© 2009 Lori Gilder. Interior Makeovers Inc

Developing Your Home Renovation Wish List

December 1st, 2009 by Lori Gilder | No Comments

Brown Residence, Week 3

By analyzing and assessing the way they really live, Liz Brown provided me with a thorough list of what they envisioned for their home and family, and primarily the direction in which this renovation project was headed.

To get a sense of the scope of the Brown’s project, let me share just some of Liz’s wish list with you:Wish List Image 3-1

Downstairs Bedrooms & Bathrooms:

  • Add one additional bedroom and connecting bathroom downstairs.
  • Add one or two additional baths to the existing children’s bedrooms.
  • Remove the current children’s bathroom due to bad location.
  • Add good size linen closet.

Kitchen:

  • Expand current kitchen dramatically and raise ceilings throughout.
  • Dining for 6-8 in kitchen.
  • Like big island with bar stools.
  • Include large picture windows.
  • Lots of cabinetry.
  • Need door to close off kitchen.
  • Design separate laundry room.
  • Can reconfigure current office, maids, and bath for better entry from garage.
  • Add butler’s pantry if possible.
  • Appliances:  8 burner range, warming drawer, XL microwave, separate sub zero refrigerator and freezer, and wine refrigerator.

Main Living Area:

  • Problem areas:  bad entry/foyer, walk through dining room to get to family room. (poor traffic flow).
  • Bad location of powder room, and low ceilings.
  • If ceilings are raised, big custom windows to bring the outside elements inside.
  • Like side lights on either side of front entry door.

Upper Master Bedroom Suite Addition:wish list image 3-1 (2nd)

  • Add one master bedroom suite upstairs.
  • One bedroom – with or without balcony.
  • Window seat if possible.
  • One room for office or treadmill with windows.
  • One bath with two toilets, one bidet, 2 sinks, shower, tub and make-up vanity area (if possible)
  • Two separate walk – in closets

I think you get the idea – Liz’s detailed wish list provided me with a strong vision as to where to begin and the direction this renovation project was headed.  From that point forward, it became my job to turn Liz and Mark’s vision into a reality.

I encourage you leave questions or comments below this post, and fill out the form on the right hand side of this page to receive your free copy of my special report: “How to Avoid the 15 Most Common Decorating Mistakes”

Article by Lori Gilder, Architectural Interior Designer, Los Angeles, Ca.
© 2009 Lori Gilder. Interior Makeovers Inc